The Spirit and the Bride

It is no coincidence that in Abraham’s life Genesis 24 follows Genesis 22.  Ok, I know that sounds obvious but what I mean is in Genesis 22 we have that – how can I say it- astounding act of obedience by Abraham to God’s command to sacrifice his son.  I deal with this in another blog but suffice it to say here that it, of course, is a foreshadow of God the Father going though the death of His own Son on the cross a couple of thousand years later.

Genesis 24 foreshadows God the Father (Abraham) sending the Holy Spirit (his faithful and intimate servant) to get a bride, the Church, (Rebecca) for His Son Jesus (Isaac).

Some points that stand out to me from this story:

  • All the servant’s master’s goods were in his hand, he just took 10 camels and off he went.10 camels
  • The servant didn’t even have to tell Rebecca what to do, she knew and did it.
  • The servant did nothing to help Rebecca water 10 thirsty camels.  I wonder how many times she had to run back and forth with water containers while he sat and watched?
  • The wait was worth it for Rebecca though.  She got some pretty cool gifts after she had passed his test.
  • Rebecca had no problem leaving her father’s house and going with this stranger to a land far away that she knew nothing much about.  Talk about trust!

It’s a lovely story with much to teach us about a right response to the Holy Spirit.  Have a read, you are sure to spot other things.

Faith

“If we emphasize faith does that mean we can forget about the law?”  Paul asks at the end of Romans 3.  And then he answers himself:  “Of course not!  In fact, only when we have faith do we truly fulfill the law.”

It seems to me that the first 4 chapters of Romans are primarily about sin, law and faith and the relationship between all three.  And up to now we have learned that we all sin, that the law doesn’t help but instead just makes the sin more obvious and that faith is somehow the answer to it all.  Paul has also introduced the concept of grace/ undeserved favour. In chapter 4 Paul tries to explain faith using Abraham as an example.

First of all it is as well to establish that Abraham was a sinner.  He mistrusted God on at least two occasions we know of and put Sarah in a compromised position, he had a child by his wife’s servant – as well as several other liaisons.  He also committed murder on several occasions – or at least he was involved in war – and would have killed his own son if God hadn’t stopped him.  By the way, it looks like Sarah had had enough after that incident since we don’t see her with him again until she is dead.  You wouldn’t blame her for not wanting to stay with a man who said God told him to kill their son.

But the Scriptures tell us, “Abraham believed God, and God counted him as righteous because of his faith.”  Abraham, just like us, needed a saviour – a God who forgives sinners.  And it was the trusting relationship with God that enabled God to pass on that forgiveness to him.  There was no way he could be with God, believing God, and not be forgiven since he couldn’t stand before God’s holiness except in a place of forgiveness.

“Oh what joy for those whose disobedience is forgiven, whose sins are put out of sight.  Yes, what joy for those whose record the Lord has cleared of sin!”  as David says.  Another man who needed a saviour.

The death of Jesus looks back as well as forward in its effects.

Abraham and Isa…

Abraham and Isaac: Father and Son It was a very long trudge up Mt. Moriah as Abraham went to sacrifice his son to his God.  He was thinking about it as he went along.  He knew that it was a common enough thing among the gods of the people’s around him for them to ask […]