The Relationship between the Four Wisdom Books in Scripture

There is no substitute for a personal relationship with the Author when reading His Scriptures.  However in the mystery of the interaction of the Holy Spirit and our minds the guidance of others is always welcome.  We can get His gentle whisperings or the mind of Christ wrong at times.  So God has given us the collective mind of Christ in our brothers and sisters.

Well, anyway, I thought this* was so good that I had to write out chunks of it again here:

The Big Picture

four squares

“Each of the four wisdom books (Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs) is different in its contribution to our education in wise living. … The four books balance each other theologically, and any one of them read out of the context of the others can be easily misunderstood.  Basically, Proverbs presents the rational, ordered norms of life, while the other three books present the exceptions and limitations to the rational, ordered approach to life.”

The Basic Approach to Life (Proverbs)

“Proverbs presents the rational, ordered norms of life.  The many proverbs in the book are not universals (i.e. things that are always true), but rather norms of life (i.e. things that are normally true).  …”

Exception 1:  The Suffering of the Righteous (Job)

“The book of Job demonstrates that there are often events in life that humans cannot grasp or understand through the wisdom approach delineated in Proverbs.  Sometimes tragedy strikes those who are wise, righteous and hard working, and God does not disclose the reasons behind such tragedy.  Proverbs teaches us that life is rational and that the wise person can understand it.  Job qualifies this with some real-world experience….. Our wisdom approach of Proverbs fails us in these situations, and we are forced to rely on faith in the Creator.  This is what we learn from Job.”

 

Exception 2:  The Failure of the Rational, Ordered Approach to Provide Ultimate Meaning to Life (Ecclesiastes)

“The book of Echardworkingclesiastes is an intellectual search for meaning in life.  While the author acknowledges that being wise is better than being stupid, he concludes that wisdom does not by itself provide meaning to life.  Also, while Job told the story of one exception to the norms of Proverbs, the cynical analysis in Ecclesiastes chronicles numerous exceptions to the thesis of an ordered, rational universe.  The ultimate conclusion in Ecclesiastes, not disclosed until the final verses, is that the only way to find meaning in life is to be in relationship with God.  Logic and rational thought (wisdom) can help you on a day-to-day basis, but ultimate meaning in life requires relationship with God.”

Exception 3:  The Irrationality of Romantic Love between a Husband and Wife (Song of Songs)

“Proverbs gives good, practical, wise advice about marriage.  It advises men not to marry women who are irrational love Piquarrelsome or ill-tempered (21:9, 19) and it depicts clearly for women the fate of lazy fools and drunkards, thus implicitly warning against marrying such men.  ….. All this advice is good and rational.

“However it is difficult to build a great love relationship in marriage with only logic and rational thought.  The Song of Songs celebrates the wild, irrational, mushy, and corny aspects of true love.  This book  suggests that in the marketplace husbands and wives may need to be the quiet, discerning, hard working people of Proverbs, but that once the lights go out in the privacy of their home, they need to be the crazy, madly-in-love, slightly irrational couple in Song of Songs.”

Amen to that.

*All quotes are taken from “Grasping God’s Word” 3rd Edition, by Duvall & Hays, Chapter 22.

Matters of the heart

Jesus said the Kingdom of God is within you.

Immediately before that in Luke 17 there is a passage about 10 lepers that are healed.  I protested to the Lord about some of this:

11 Now on his way to Jerusalem, Jesus traveled along the border between Samaria and Galilee. 12 As he was going into a village, ten men who had leprosy met him. They stood at a distance 13 and called out in a loud voice, “Jesus, Master, have pity on us!”

14 When he saw them, he said, “Go, show yourselves to the priests.” And as they went, they were cleansed.

15 One of them, when he saw he was healed, came back, praising God in a loud voice. 16 He threw himself at Jesus’ feet and thanked him—and he was a Samaritan.

17 Jesus asked, “Were not all ten cleansed? Where are the other nine? 18 Has no one returned to give praise to God except this foreigner?” 19 Then he said to him, “Rise and go; your faith has made you well.”

“What is with You here Lord?” I practically shouted out while driving my car to work the other day and listening to an audio bible on my smartphone.  “You told them to go and show themselves to the priests.  They were obeying You and yet You commend the one who doesn’t and reprimand the ones that do what You told them!”  On top of that they were obeying the law also.  What did they do wrong?Sheldon_Cooper

I don’t know if you watch the Big Bang Theory.  I don’t actually, just seen an episode or two (no really).  Well anyway in it there is this character called Sheldon.  He is very bright but has no cop on at all.  He can’t see why the most obvious things are wrong.  No matter what you say to him he will take it up literally and answer according to exactly what you say, truthfully every time (I watch it just to experience the cringes).  When I thought of it, my reaction to that passage was a lot like the way Sheldon might have reacted.

Any child with any sort of manners would think it obvious to give thanks to the one who made him well.  Why didn’t the others respond from their hearts instead of just religion?  Had their religion made them miss the obvious?

Hmm…